Marianne Boruch’s Favorite Cadaver

Faculty member Marianne Boruch and her poem “Cadaver, Speak” are the focus of the Weekly Poem at PBS.org:

When poet Marianne Boruch took a gross anatomy class at Purdue University, she found she had a favorite cadaver — a female who had been nearly 100 years old — of the four bodies, donated for medical study, that were in the lab.

Continue reading online…

Read More

“Daughters of the Spring” by Lauren Groff

A new piece by faculty member Lauren Groff appears at Oxford American:

A few miles southwest of Gainesville, the arching oaks of central Florida loosen into long fields full of beef steer. They tighten up again into the Goethe State Forest (pronounced, hereabouts, as Go-thee), and finally peter out into US-19, a soulless and endless miracle mile of corporate chains from Applebee’s to Zaxby’s, hitting nearly every letter between. In the town of Homosassa, I saw a smiling gray manatee the size of a VW van on the side of the road, surrounded by a sea of yard-sign valentines that someone had left to fade in the March sun. Homosassa is famous for being one of the best places in Florida to view West Indian manatees, those gentle thousand-pound sea cows that are routinely torn up by jet skis and motorboats.

Continue reading online…

Read More

“Short Story: A Process of Revision” by Antonya Nelson

A new piece by faculty member Antonya Nelson appears at Tin House:

Last spring, I taught an undergraduate fiction workshop that differed significantly from any other workshop I’ve taught or taken: I tried to have my students mimic the process I go through when writing a story. In most workshops, students are charged with creating two or three short stories in the course of fifteen weeks. But I myself have never written three short stories in a semester—at least, not since graduate school, when I was in a workshop that demanded it of me. I don’t know many writers for whom three stories in fifteen weeks is a habit, but somehow in workshops it’s become the procedure. The fact that that doesn’t replicate my own process seemed sort of weird after a while.

Continue reading online…

Read More

A Conversation with Poet Jayne Benjulian

An interview with poet Jayne Benjulian (poetry, ’13), entitled “Lifting the Domestic,” appears online in Mother Writer Mentor:

In her review at The California Journal of Women Writers, Benjulian writes eloquently about the ways in which poems about the domestic sphere are overlooked in the contemporary publishing scene.

Continue reading online…

Read More

An Interview with Poet Joanne Dwyer

An interview with alumna Joanne Dwyer (poetry, ’09) about her debut book Belle Laide appears at Identity Theory:

Joanne Dominique Dwyer was born in Rockaway Beach, Queens, NY. She has lived in New Mexico for most of her adult life. Dwyer has been published in various journals, such as The American Poetry Review, Conduit, The Florida Review, Gulf Coast, The Massachusetts Review, The New England Review, Poetry, TriQuarterly and others. She received a Rona Jaffe award and holds an MFA from Warren Wilson. Her first book of poems, Belle Laide, was published by Sarabande in 2013.

Continue reading online…

Read More